Convention unanimously approves structure plan

first_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service General Convention, TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab July 17, 2012 at 10:07 pm My voice text above got a few words wrong. The intent is to more directly connect…not dialysis …Vc to the people in the pew. Rector Knoxville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Comments are closed. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Albany, NY July 15, 2012 at 5:45 pm Two thirds majority for ALL VOTES would reflect the general mind of the church and cut down on number of passed resolutions. A simple majority simply indicates a divided mind. david hill says: July 16, 2012 at 1:22 am David Saha is a better man than me if he can understand Bishop Stacy Saul’s presentation. Is there a layman’s explanation? Just sayin.. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ July 17, 2012 at 3:39 pm The racial, gender, class, and clergy/laity diversity of the task force will show how serious the Episcopal Church will be in its reimagining. jim shumard says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA jim Shumard says: David Saha says: Julie Reid says: Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Structure July 17, 2012 at 10:04 pm Here is a suggestion to help tonight general convention to the people in the pew. Have dialysis in executive committee meet within 30 days of general convention And they must concur with every passed resolution for them to be implemented. This would give more power to convocations Since the members are elected by them. Just 1 of many suggestions jim shumard says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 July 12, 2012 at 12:08 pm We need to examine our church structure in light of a changing culture. Emerging technologies, changing global conditions, and communities that are morphing right before our eyes. The church needs to have a structure that reflects the world that it lives within, it needs to be nimble. I am encouraged by all I have read this week and the visionary leadership of the Bishops who have agreed to lead the charge for change. Comments (9) Rector Bath, NC center_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Tags Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Rev. Fred Fenton says: Submit a Job Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Smithfield, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Ana Arellano says: Barbara Calvin says: Convention unanimously approves structure plan ‘The Holy Spirit is leading us forward’ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET July 12, 2012 at 4:40 pm I have not been in the Episcopal church very long, so I am not familiar with problems created by the existing church structure that the movement is trying to solve. Is the movement intended to give individual parishes more control over what they do? Are there existing barriers to doing certain things? Is this about same sex couples and transgender policy issues? Or is this intended to look at streamlining diocesan and national administration for cost savings? It sounds like a significant amount of financial resources are willing to be spent on the restructuring issue, so it would be good to have a more specific explanation of what this is all about. Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA [Episcopal News Service – Indianapolis] Applause and cheers erupted July 11 as Resolution C095, which calls for creation of a task force to re-imagine the workings of the Episcopal Church in the 21st century, sailed unanimously through the House of Bishops.A day earlier, deputies also had passed the measure unanimously.The resolution creates a special task force of up to 24 people who will gather ideas in the next two years from all levels of the church about possible reforms to its structures, governance and administration. Their work will culminate in a special gathering of people from every diocese to hear what recommendations the task force plans to make to the 78th General Convention. Its final report is due by November 2014.Several bishops spoke in favor of the resolution.Prior to the vote, Bishop Ian Douglas of Connecticut urged its passage. “I do believe the Holy Spirit is leading us forward,” he said, noting two previous moments when the church underwent sweeping change.“I believe we are in exactly the same circumstance at this time,” he said. “I do believe the Holy Spirit worked through the General Convention in 1835 and in 1919, there were special committees that proposed the new structures. I believe the Holy Spirit is working through this resolution and, if I didn’t believe it, the fact that the House of Deputies voted unanimously is proof to me.”When Bishop Thomas Ely of Vermont questioned: “who’s going to pay for the special gathering” provided for in the measure, several bishops responded: “Vermont.”Ely explained that structural reform had been allocated $200,000 in the budget and said he wondered, “What other thought has been given to fund it. Do we need to go home and prepare for it in our budgets or what?”Bishop Samuel Johnson Howard of Florida, who chairs the committee on structure, said that the committee: “is so thoroughly convinced of the process of the Spirit, that it will be blessed. We believe $200,000 may become half a million, like the loaves and fishes that the Lord will provide. Don’t let the money stop you right now.Bishop Skip Adams of Central New York said that, “many of us are having similar conversations in our diocese and are making the same kind of movement. We plan on using it as a model for our ongoing dialogue within the diocese. We recognize that in order to accomplish the Holy Spirit’s movement, we must be doing the same thing on the local level and that will enable this to happen for us in concert with who God is calling us to be and become.”Bishop Stacy Sauls, chief operating officer for the Episcopal Church, praised the work of both the committee and convention.“My hope has always been that we would begin to have a conversation and the church embraced that. The conversation became a movement of hope for the future of the church.”He added that the people of Episcopal Church have realized – and the institutional is getting it – “that we are standing on the brink of an unprecedented moment; have seen it as opportunity rather than threat.”In other convention business, bishops also signed off on the budget with very little conversation (see related story) and passed an amended substitute for Resolution B021, which involves the dissolution of a pastoral relationship between a bishop and a diocese. The amendment involved changing the votes required to dissolve a relationship to a two-thirds, rather than a simple, majority.Assisting Bishop Carol Gallagher of North Dakota told bishops: “As somebody who has had my life directly affected by a dissolution, I am grateful for the work of our bishops who gathered together and wanted a word of thanks for myself personally. That this is incredibly pastoral and incredibly sincere and demonstrates our willingness to be a house together and compassionate toward one another. Thank you.”Bishop Suffragan Mary Glasspool of Los Angeles, who was among a group asked by the presiding bishop to develop the substitute resolution, told the house “we want this to be an instrument of reconciliation mostly.“We’re all working toward reconciliation,” Glasspool said. “Unfortunately, the dissolution piece had to be in there if everything else fails, but the spirit of this was that this was meant to be an instrument of reconciliation and not a weapon or a tool or a threat for dissolution.”Bishop Martin Field of West Missouri proposed the amendment, “that all the votes, literally, whether they be in the diocesan convention or among the bishops here become supermajority and not a simple majority, so two-thirds majority,” he said.“This is different thing than our Title IV dissolution. This is something wholly based in relationships at many, many levels, not the least of which is our relationship in this house, but it goes all the way down to the core of a diocese. I think it needs to rise to the highest form of decision-making, and we need to bring this up to a very high bar before any bishop is brought to the possibility of the dissolution of that pastoral relationship. We need a high standard for standing committees … we need a high standard throughout.”At the start of the morning session, Bishop Michael Smith of North Dakota read a seven-point Indianapolis Report to the house, dissenting to such General Convention actions as approval of a liturgy for blessing same-gender relationships and declining to approve the Anglican Covenant.Bishops also approved legislation that: condemned the practice of wage theft (C077); moving toward full inclusion of persons with disabilities (D068); reaffirmed its commitment to the network of Jubilee Ministries (D063); and to consider allocation of funds to create programs to prevent the “pipeline from school to prison” for some children in challenged communities (B024).–The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg, Episcopal News Service editor/reporter, contributed to this report. Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Press Release Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL General Convention 2012, Featured Events July 12, 2012 at 11:06 am It is all too easy to decide to study the need for root and branch reform of our life together in the 21st century. No wonder the vote was unanimous. What we need is leaders with vision. Little of that was shown at this General Convention. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS By Pat McCaughanPosted Jul 11, 2012 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR July 13, 2012 at 8:12 am I respectfully disagree with the emphasis the Rev. Fenton places on the bishops. Too much is expected from the top of the hierarchy, the bishops, for imagining how the church would best participate in God’s mission. To the credit of the convention, the task force is specifically asked to have members that are young adults and also less tied to the center of the church. Of course, the General Convention of 2015 would review the recommendations. The implementation should require cooperation from all levels of the church, and of course the bishops would play a key role. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA last_img read more

Rapidísimas

first_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Knoxville, TN Por Onell A. SotoPosted Aug 14, 2012 Paul Ryan congresista conservador republicano y ex gobernador de Wisconsin, ha sido escogido por Mitt Romney para que lo acompañe como candidato a la vice-presidencia de Estados Unidos. Romney dijo que su compañero tiene “gran firmeza” e “integridad incuestionable”. Ryan, 42, es considerado un experto en cuestiones financieras y está a favor de otorgarles ventajas tributarias a los ricos. Es miembro del “Tea Party” el grupo conservador que se opone a las reformas de Barack Obama. Aunque no ha tenido mucha experiencia política, lo consideran como una estrella emergente del Partido Republicano. Él y Janna, su esposa, tienen tres hijos pequeños. La familia asiste a la Iglesia San Juan Vianney, una parroquia católica romana in Janesville, Wisconsin.El arzobispo de Cantórbery está buscando candidatos para ser su representante ante la Santa Sede (Vaticano) y ser director del Centro Anglicano de Roma. El actual director, David Richardson, se jubila en el 2013. Los candidatos deben ser obispos o deanes de catedral, tener experiencia ecuménica, excelencia en teología y diplomacia.Miembros de diferentes comunidades religiosas han expresado su pesar y apoyo a la comunidad sij luego de que un hombre armado mató a seis personas en un templo en Milwaukee. El sijismo es una religión india que surgió en el siglo XVI y tiene influencias doctrinales del hinduismo y del islam. La comunidad fue fundada por el Gurú Nanak.El obispo Diego Padrón, presidente de la Conferencia Episcopal de Venezuela, dijo que la enfermedad de Chávez es “la mayor interrogante del país” y añadió que el secreto como estrategia es uno de los rasgos característicos del gobierno. Dijo también que por el bien del país “el proceso electoral debe ser equitativo y transparente”.Ibrahim Mogra, secretario general asistente del Consejo Musulmán de Gran Bretaña, ha dicho que está “profundamente preocupado” por la decisión de una corte de Colonia, Alemania, de prohibir la circuncisión infantil. La ley estipula además que los padres pueden ser enjuiciados por causar “una herida corporal” a sus hijos si permiten la circuncisión. La medida afecta tanto a musulmanes como a judíos.Carlos Rodríguez Mansilla, escribe en su revista Nueva Argentina: Antes de 1492, hubo en España “cristianos viejos” y “cristianos nuevos”. Desde hacía siglos las uniones matrimoniales y las conversiones eran una realidad. El confesor de la reina Isabel la Católica era un sefardí bautizado cristiano y Santa Teresa de Jesús era nieta de sefardíes conversos. Lo eran también San Juan de la Cruz, Antonio de Nebrija, Luis Vives, Fray Bartolomé de Las Casas, Francisco de Vitoria, Juan de Ávila y Fray Luis de León. Los sefardíes son descendientes de los judíos que vivieron en la península ibérica hasta 1492. Los inmigrantes llamaron a España Sefarad, que significa “lugar muy lejano”.Desde hace años, expertos demógrafos han dicho que Filipinas (casi 100 millones de habitantes) tiene que estabilizar su población si quiere evitar una “catástrofe social”. Recientemente el presidente Benigno Aquino pidió a la Cámara de Representantes que aprobara un proyecto de ley que permitiera el control de la natalidad. La Iglesia Católica Romana se opuso rotundamente pero aún así 188 de los 231 legisladores presentes votaron a favor de la ley, que todavía tendrá que ser aprobada por el Senado.Las iglesias siguen sintiendo los efectos de “la Gran Recesión” de 2008 al tiempo que las contribuciones han disminuido en 1.200 millones de dólares, según el Anuario de Iglesias Estadounidenses y Canadienses 2012 publicado por el Consejo Nacional de Iglesias.La Iglesia de Inglaterra (anglicana) ha retirado inversiones por valor de 3 millones de dólares de la compañía News Corporation propiedad de Rupert Murdoch, el magnate australiano-americano de origen judío de 80 años que controla el mayor imperio periodístico del mundo. La compañía ha sido acusada de prácticas deshonestas en la producción de noticias, incluyendo intervenciones ilegales de teléfonos.Después de una encuesta, la Asociación Nacional de Evangélicos ha encontrado que el 68 por ciento de sus miembros no cree que Estados Unidos sea un “país cristiano” como piensan otras naciones, pero es en realidad “un lugar fértil para la evangelización”.El Registro de Cultos del Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores de Argentina informa que en el país se funda una iglesia evangélica por día como promedio. La mayoría de las iglesias son pentecostales y en menor proporción bautistas. Un titular de un tabloide dice “¿Dejará Argentina de ser católica?”Billy Graham, 93, está ingresado con bronquitis en un hospital de Asheville, NC.JUICIO. El Señor, aborrece a los mentirosos. Salmo 12:22. Rector Albany, NY Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release Press Release Service Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Belleville, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Job Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector Columbus, GA center_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Martinsville, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rapidísimas This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Events Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Bath, NC Rector Collierville, TN Rector Tampa, FL last_img read more

The Rev. Jon M. White named next editor of Episcopal…

first_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis People Featured Jobs & Calls David Clayton says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Posted Oct 23, 2014 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Events Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME October 23, 2014 at 7:06 pm I’m so pleased that the Episcopal Cafe will continue. It has been invaluable to me as a newer member of the Episcopal Church. Thanks be to God! Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Press Release Service Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY [Canticle Communications] The Rev. Jon M. White, rector of St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, in Beckley, West Virginia, will become the new editor of Episcopal Café on Nov. 25, the Café’s founding editor Jim Naughton announced today.“I am excited that Jon has volunteered to lead the Café into a new phase in its life,” Naughton said. “Many talented people expressed an interest in the editorship when I announced that I planned to step down. What set Jon apart was a firm understanding of the importance of the Café’s role as an independent source of church news, and a clear vision of how to sustain the site in the years ahead.”White, 47, is a 2012 graduate of Bexley Seabury, and was ordained in the Diocese of Oregon. He is a native of Indianapolis and an alumnus of Portland State University. White served seven years in the U.S. Navy’s Submarine Service and later in the Coast Guard Reserve. Prior to ordination he worked as an engineer in the high tech industry. He has lived in Australia, England and Zimbabwe.“As a long time reader of the Café, I am excited about this new adventure;” said White. “The Café opened up the church to me when I was just beginning my Episcopal adventure and I am hopeful and eager that we will continue to provide ways for people to learn about and engage with their church.”In speaking of the future, White said that his intention is to continue to provide the kind of quality content that has been the Café’s hallmark. “Our first goal,” White said, “is to maintain the integrity of the Café and ensure its place as the prominent place for news and insight about the Episcopal Church.”The Café was launched in mid-April 2007 and according to Google Analytics has been visited from more than 367,000 computers in the last 12 months. It has more than 13,000 followers on Facebook and more than 11,000 on Twitter.“A lot has changed since 2007, technology-wise,” White said, “and we need to move the site to a new platform to ensure we can keep it up and running. So, since we need to make that move we’ll be taking the opportunity to redesign the look and feel of the site as well.” White said that the plan is to shutdown the site Thanksgiving Week and re-launch on Dec. 1, the beginning of Advent.Naughton, who maintained two blogs before launching the Café, has been writing about Episcopal Church and Anglican Communion news online for almost nine years. He plans to work on a writing project unrelated to the church after signing off on Nov. 24.“I want to thank John Chilton of the Diocese of Virginia, the Rev. Ann Fontaine of the Diocese of Oregon and the Rev. Andrew Gerns of the Diocese of Bethlehem, who have been contributing to the Café for as long as it has been in existence,” Naughton said. “Ann deserves special thanks for her tireless work in spotting news items and working with writers on the Daily Episcopalian and Speaking to the Soul blogs.”Naughton also thanked Bill Joseph, the Café’s webmaster, C. Robin Janning of Episcopal Church in the Visual Arts, who maintains the Café’s art blog, and Bishop Nicholas Knisely of the Diocese of Rhode Island and the Rev. Torey Lightcap of the Diocese of Iowa for their long associate with the Café.“I’ll miss working with new bloggers like the Rev. Kurt Weisner of the Diocese of New Hampshire, Theresa Johnson of the Diocese of Florida, the Rev. Megan Castellan of the Diocese of West Missouri and the Rev. Weston Mathews of the Diocese of Virginia,” he added. “They do an excellent job not only in keeping the church informed, but in provoking conversation, and, every now and then, making people laugh.”The Diocese of Washington sponsored Episcopal Café from 2007-09, but the site became independent when Naughton left the diocese. Rector Martinsville, VA Tags Comments (1) Submit a Press Release Rector Smithfield, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Shreveport, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Collierville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Rev. Jon M. White named next editor of Episcopal Café TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Albany, NY Comments are closed. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit a Job Listing Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GAlast_img read more

TREC presents final report for General Convention 2015 consideration

first_img December 23, 2014 at 9:50 pm Looks like more politics to me. When will they ever learn? Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs press release] The Task Force for Reimagining the Episcopal Church (TREC) has presented its final report to the 78th General Convention and to the Church, and for inclusion in Reports to General Convention, commonly referred to as The Blue Book.The report is available in English and Spanish.Also on Dec. 14, TREC also released A Word to the Episcopal Church about its final report.TREC’s work was directed by Resolution C095, which was approved by the 77th General Convention in 2012, with the specific task of preparing recommendations to the 78th General Convention for reimaging and restructuring the church.The Episcopal Church’s 78th General Convention, June 25-July 3 will be held at the Salt Palace Convention Center in Salt Lake City, Utah.The Episcopal Church’s General Convention is held every three years, and is the bicameral governing body of the Church. It is comprised of the House of Bishops, with upwards of 200 active and retired bishops and the House of Deputies, with clergy and lay representatives elected from the 109 dioceses of the Church, at more than 800 members. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID General Convention 2015, Rector Collierville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Albany, NY Oliver Jones says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rev. Ruth B Paulus says: December 21, 2014 at 2:34 am Well intentioned vacuous rubbish. December 15, 2014 at 4:28 pm This is a pretty bold and thought-provoking report to be sure. I think they did a good job of laying out all the issues, naming the challenges that exist and presenting some overall solid reccomendations. Not all of them will be adopted at GC 2016, but that’s to be expected. I appreciate their efforts. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Rev. Vince Jang says: Rector Knoxville, TN TREC presents final report for General Convention 2015 consideration Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Rev. John Crist says: Featured Events Rector Martinsville, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York PJ Cabbiness says: Rector Smithfield, NC Structure, Rector Belleville, IL Tags Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Jobs & Calls Curate Diocese of Nebraska Youth Minister Lorton, VA January 7, 2015 at 9:32 am Hmm. Not one mention of health insurance. Odd, considering that’s the biggest cost item in many budgets. Kenneth Knapp says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY January 14, 2015 at 4:47 pm The report says that “one priest, one Altar” may no longer be viable. HELLO, that model hasn’t been viable in the rural areas served by PEC for 25 years. Cluster ministries and yoked parishes are not new ideas, but they are good and viable ways to address the problems faced by small congregations. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rich Basta says: Submit a Press Release Submit an Event Listing Comments (7) December 16, 2014 at 12:59 pm I truly believe that this brings a tremendous sense of hope and renewal. It is about time. The Spirit is well and alive in the church and we need to get out of the Spirit’s way! Hear what the Spirit is saying to the churches. How incredibly refreshing. Thank you for all your hard work! Episcopal Office of Public Affairs, Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group December 31, 2014 at 6:34 pm I started to write some input in a separate group. I am glad to see some of my viewpoints, shared by others are included. I do agree we still have a long way to go and hope reimagining will continue on after this convention is concluded. I had to go do something else which regretfully I did not complete further input. Thanks to all who assisted in this task as well. Associate Rector Columbus, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Bath, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Tampa, FL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Posted Dec 15, 2014 Task Force for Reimagining the Episcopal Church Press Release Service General Convention, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Comments are closed. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC last_img read more

Quebec Anglicans remember victims of city mosque shooting on first…

first_img Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Advocacy Peace & Justice, Submit a Job Listing Rector Belleville, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Tampa, FL Anglican Communion, This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem [Anglican Communion News Service] Quebec City’s Anglican community will be one of six spiritual groups gathering to offer reflective song and prayer to the public Jan. 28, at a commemoration of the mass shooting at the city’s Grand Mosque a year ago. Meanwhile, Anglicans in the city have been supporting efforts to provide a new home for a member of the mosque, whose heroic actions during the attack left him paralyzed from the chest down. Six men were killed and 19 others wounded when a gunman opened fire on worshippers at the mosque as they prayed shortly before 8 p.m. on January 29, 2017. Alexandre Bissonnette, a university student, has been charged with first-degree murder in relation to the attack.Read the entire article here. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Quebec Anglicans remember victims of city mosque shooting on first anniversary of attack Press Release Service Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Bath, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate Diocese of Nebraska Posted Jan 24, 2018 Gun Violence TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Albany, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Events Submit an Event Listing Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Press Release Tags Rector Washington, DClast_img read more

Council proposes balanced draft budget with $133.7 million price tag…

first_imgCouncil proposes balanced draft budget with $133.7 million price tag for next three years Church’s 2019-2021 budget awaits General Convention’s approval Rector Shreveport, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Rev. Mally Lloyd, right, the committee member who lead Executive Council’s Joint Standing Committee on Finances for Mission budget work, presents the 2019-2021 draft budget to council with Tess Judge, FFM chair. Photo: Shannon Ferguson Kelly[Episcopal News Service] The Episcopal Church’s Executive Council on Jan. 24 approved a $133.7 million draft budget for the 2019-2021 triennium that is based on requiring Episcopal Church dioceses to contribute annually 15 percent of their operating income.UPDATE: Episcopal Church draft budget for 2019-2021 available for reviewThe budget, which is essentially balanced, with a small surplus of just $2,654, is far from final. It must eventually be approved by General Convention when it meets in Austin, Texas, July 5-13. It will no doubt undergo some changes between now and then.The budget is based on an anticipated $133.7 million in revenue to pay for an equal amount in expenses. The triennial budget is up about $8.7 million from that approved by the 2015 meeting of General Convention for the current 2016-2018 triennium.The draft budget increases the money allocated for evangelism over that which was included in the most recent iteration because, in the words of House of Deputies President the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, council heard a “clarion call” from the church to do so. Evangelism is one of the three priorities General Convention set for the church at its last meeting in 2015. The final version of council’s draft budget also includes increases in the other two priorities of racial justice and reconciliation, and creation care.Council’s Joint Standing Committee on Finances for Mission, which crafted the budget, “focused on looking at every line in this budget because it’s not only important that we talk the Jesus Movement but that we walk the Jesus Movement,” said its chair, Tess Judge.Presiding Bishop Michael Curry thanks Executive Council’s Joint Standing Committee on Finances for Mission members for their “hard and faithful work, and careful listening” during the committee’s preparation of council’s 2019-2021 draft budget. Photo: Shannon Ferguson KellyPresiding Bishop Michael Curry said during a post-meeting news conference that the budget process “reflects a community coming together, doing the hard work, seeking to keep Christ at the center.” FFM listened “deeply and seriously” to the rest of council, to the more than 200 people who responded to a survey on the budget and to the churchwide staff, he said.In the end, he said, it involved finding ways “to fund the work in the direction we believe and pray that the church is and ought to be going.” Curry said the budget reflects “a church moving forward” into the vision of the Jesus Movement that he and General Convention began articulating in 2015.“It’s a holistic vision of the church being the church, proclaiming the good news of Jesus, bearing witness to him in new ways but continuing in old ways,” he said. “It is the church being the church of Jesus Christ in the world for today. And, that is the Jesus Movement.”Jennings said during the news conference that the budget work was an effort to reflect “who we believe we are as a church and who we believe God is calling us to be as church.”The Rev. Susan Brown Snook, the council member who chairs the Joint Standing Committee on Local Ministry and Mission, which shepherds the church’s evangelism work, thanked FFM members for listening to council members and others in the church and adjusting evangelism funding. By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jan 24, 2018 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Collierville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Belleville, IL Executive Council, General Convention 2018, Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Episcopal Church’s three-year budgets are funded primarily by pledges from the church’s 109 dioceses and three regional areas. Each year’s annual giving in the three-year budget is based on a diocese’s income two years earlier. In the current budget, dioceses can exempt the first $150,000 of income. Council’s draft budget drops that exemption to $140,000. The exemption was $120,000 during the 2012-2015 triennium.Not all dioceses pay the full asking for a variety of reasons. Diocesan commitments for 2016 and 2017 are here.At the 2015 meeting of General Convention, bishops and deputies turned the current voluntary diocesan budgetary asking system into a mandatory assessment, beginning with the 2019-2021 budget cycle. Dioceses may ask for full or partial waivers. Without getting a waiver, a diocese that does not pay the full assessment will be unable to get grants or loans from the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society (the name under which the Episcopal Church is incorporated, conducts business and carries out mission).Council’s draft states that the budget would have $89.5 million in diocesan revenue if all of the church’s dioceses fully make their mandatory assessment payments. However, FFM anticipates that up to 20 dioceses will get full or partial waivers of those payments under a system that will go into effect in the 2019-2021 triennium, which could equal up to $5.9 million, according to the Rev. Mally Lloyd, the member of council’s Joint Standing Committee on Finances for Mission who led its budget work. Thus, the likely total diocesan contribution is pegged at $83.6 million.Council’s Assessment Review Committee has begun talking to dioceses that do not currently pay the full amount of the assessment or who anticipate asking for a partial or full waiver in 2019.Lloyd told council that FFM reduced the amount of anticipated assessment waivers by $1.3 million from the version of the budget it began working on at the start of this Jan. 22-24 meeting. FFM decided to reserve less than the full amount accounted for in the anticipated waivers “so that we have an impetus to push dioceses further along” by not starting from the assumption that all waivers would be granted at the amounts requested, she said.Other major sources of anticipated income include $31.7 million from a 5 percent draw on the interest earned by the church’s investments and $10.2 million in rental income at the Episcopal Church Center in Manhattan. A planned annual appeal for contributions to the churchwide budget from Episcopalians is projected to raise $1 million over the three years of the budget.Tess Judge, chair of Executive Council’s Joint Standing Committee on Finances for Mission, shows off her voluminous three-ring binder with which she kept track of the committee’s work on the 2019-2021 draft budget. Photo: Shannon Ferguson KellyFFM applied the additional income it found to the budget’s expense lines. Among the larger additions to its previous version of the draft budget is $1.86 million into the line items for evangelism, including money for a new staff position. Committee members also removed an earlier request that staffers working in evangelism cut $400,000 from their 2019-2021 budget.Money was also budgeted for a new staff member each for the church’s racial justice and reconciliation work and creation care work.The budget also includes money for paying a full-time salary and benefits to the president of the House of Deputies. That position, which is filled by election during each meeting of convention, has always been unpaid. The president has a travel budget and a paid assistant.The Rev. Michael Barlowe, the secretary of General Convention, said during a post-meeting news conference that the office of House of Deputies president has evolved in recent decades along with the office of the presiding bishop. The issue of compensating that officeholder has been discussed for decades, he added, and the Task Force to Study Church Leadership and Compensation has concluded that being the president of the House of Deputies is now a full-time job. Supporters of the change say making the office a paid job would broaden the pool of people able to consider running for election.Next steps in the budget processAccording to the joint rules of General Convention (II.10.c.ii on page 227 here), council must give its draft budget to General Convention’s Joint Standing Committee on Program, Budget and Finance (PB&F) no less than four months before the start of General Convention (essentially by February of convention year). PB&F will meet next from Feb. 5-7 to begin work on that draft budget.PB&F uses the draft budget and any legislation passed by or being considered by General Convention to create a final budget proposal. Convention legislative committees and PB&F will begin meeting in Austin, Texas, on July 3, 2018, ahead of the July 5-13 meeting of convention in the Texas capital city. There will be at least one open hearing, currently set for the evening of July 5.PB&F’s budget must be presented to a joint session of the houses of Bishops and Deputies no later than the third day before convention’s scheduled adjournment. According to the draft convention schedule, that presentation is set to take place at 10:30 p.m. CDT on July 11.The two houses then debate and vote on the budget separately. Both houses must approve the same version of the budget, which takes effect at the beginning of 2019.Executive Council crafts annual budgets out of the spending plan that General Convention passes as the triennial budget. Typically, council adjusts each of the three annual budgets based on changing income and expenses.Summaries of all the resolutions council passed at this meeting are here.Some council members tweeted from the meeting using #ExCoun.The Jan 22-24 meeting took place at the Maritime Institute Conference Center in suburban Baltimore, Maryland.The Executive Council carries out the programs and policies adopted by the General Convention, according to Canon I.4 (1). The council comprises 38 members – 20 of whom (four bishops, four priests or deacons, and 12 lay people) are elected by General Convention and 18 (one clergy and one lay) by the nine provincial synods for six-year terms – plus the presiding bishop and the president of the House of Deputies. In addition, the vice president of the House of Deputies, secretary, chief operating officer, treasurer and chief financial officer have a seat and voice but no vote.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is interim managing editor of the Episcopal News Service. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Events Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Knoxville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Tags Featured Jobs & Calls Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Tampa, FL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET center_img Submit a Press Release Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit an Event Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET General Convention, The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Press Release Service Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Executive Council January 2018, Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Program Budget & Finance Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Bath, NClast_img read more

Pilgrimage to new ‘lynching memorial’ fosters racial understanding

first_imgPilgrimage to new ‘lynching memorial’ fosters racial understanding By Michelle HiskeyPosted Aug 29, 2018 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel August 29, 2018 at 5:19 pm Trinity-by-the-Cove Episcopal Church, Naples FL has planned an inter-generational Pilgrimage March 8-12, 2019 to Atlanta, Birmingham, Selma, and Montgomery. We have 40 youth/adults traveling by motor coach. Formation curriculum has been designed to prepare Pilgrims for what they will experience. “In the Footsteps of Martin Luther King Jr: Tracing the Biblical Message and Life of a Martyr” will be a Pilgrimage of reflection and fellowship. Tags Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Frances J Sills says: Sara P Irwin says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit a Press Release This April 28, 2018, photo shows pillars inscribed with the names of victims of lynching from Southern states hang from the ceilings inside the National Memorial for Peace and Justice in Montgomery, Alabama. Photo: Evan Frost/AP[Episcopal News Service — Montgomery, Alabama] A spiritual pilgrimage can lay bare old scars, change who you are and how you see other people. That’s what many members of St. Bartholomew’s Episcopal Church in Atlanta reported after experiencing the new National Memorial for Peace and Justice and the collective story of more than 4,400 people who were lynched in this country.These 82 travelers also stopped at the Legacy Museum nearby, which connects slavery and racial terrorism to mass incarceration in the United States. Their long-planned journey followed last month’s General Convention support for “Becoming Beloved Community,” the Episcopal Church’s interrelated resources for responding to racial injustice and organizing for reconciliation and healing. The convention passed resolutions tied to racial reconciliation, which is among the church’s three main priorities.“I don’t think anything can fully prepare one for the atrocity that is part of our history,” the Rev. Angela Shepherd, St. Bartholomew’s rector, preached on Aug. 26, the morning after the pilgrimage, as participants continued to process the reality that between 1877 and 1950 more than 4,400 African-American men, women, and children were hanged, burned alive, shot, drowned or beaten to death by white mobs.Facing that history, she and the pilgrimage participants believe, is a critical first step to countering the racial injustices embedded in our society today. Building this bridge is important at St. Bartholomew’s, which in April called Shepherd as its first female rector and first African-American rector. Located in DeKalb County, a fast-growing refugee and non-English speaking county that includes part of the city of Atlanta, St. Bartholomew’s 2017 profile described its membership as 96 percent white.“We long for a more racially and ethnically diverse community, but have not yet made the necessary changes for that community to flourish,” the profile stated. “We are seeking new strategies.”Barriers to the destinationThis marker for DeKalb County, Georgia, in which St. Bartholomew’s Episcopal Church is located, indicates that the most recent lynching happened less than a decade before the church opened its doors. Photo: Virginia MurrayDespite careful planning for the 340-mile round trip journey, the group from St. Bartholomew’s encountered barriers that for many symbolized the profound discomfort of spiritual change.The departure was delayed while the chartered bus service located an approved driver. Near Tuskegee, Alabama, the bus broke down in the summer heat. Its replacement was a shuttle full of items belonging to another tour group. Transformation apparently had its own itinerary.The three-hour delay extended the travelers’ time for considering the history of racial violence along the Interstate 85 route, as researched and shared by trip organizers. Near the Newnan, Georgia, exit, the 1899 lynching of Sam Hose drew trainloads of Atlanta spectators who watched his burning and mutilation, with parts of his body taken as souvenirs. Near Lanett, Alabama, in 1912, four African-Americans were shot 300 times and left strung up beside a baptismal font outside a church.Deaths by mob violence recall the crucifixion of Christ, a connection that the group had explored this summer by reading and discussing “The Cross and the Lynching Tree” by black liberation theologian James H. Cone.As the travelers reached their destination, Shepherd read from the book’s closing exhortation, that Christians grasp the cross and lynching tree as blueprints for racial reconciliation.“We were made brothers and sisters by the blood of the lynching tree, the blood of sexual union, and the blood of the cross of Jesus,” she read. “No gulf between blacks and whites is too great to overcome, for our beauty is more enduring than our brutality.”Personal stories intertwine with past violenceOur common humanity was a message that gained momentum at the stark national memorial. No selfies are allowed, and the coffin-sized, rusting metal sculptures — each representing a county in which lynching occurred, and stenciled with the names of those executed — are meant to inspire individual and communal commitment to a just and peaceful future.“Your names were never lost, each name a holy word,” Elizabeth Alexander wrote in her poem “Invocation” posted at the memorial.The six-acre memorial grew out of the conviction that lynching was the single most powerful way that Americans enforced racial inequalities after slavery ended. This sanctioned violence spurred the exodus of 6 million African-Americans (the Great Migration) that indelibly changed the United States economically, physically, demographically, spiritually.The country’s first national memorial acknowledging victims of racial terror lynchings is based on research by the Equal Justice Initiative (EJI), led by Bryan Stevenson, a visionary public interest attorney, bestselling memoirist (“Just Mercy”) and MacArthur Foundation “Genius” Grant recipient. Stevenson has said that this work is driven by his Christian faith, nurtured in the African Methodist Episcopal Church.For some in the mostly white St. Bartholomew’s group, the memorial sculptures summoned personal history. Nora Robillard found 10 names inscribed on the one for Clarke County, Mississippi, “That’s where I was born,” she remarked.Juliana Lancaster recognized a surname on the Spalding County, Georgia, memorial. “I think I found a relative,” she said.“Fifteen unknown people in Texas died on my birthdate,” said Loren Williams. “I can’t believe I will celebrate another birthday without thinking about that.”Meanwhile, Shepherd discovered familiar names on memorials for the counties in Kentucky and Tennessee where her family is rooted.In DeKalb County, Georgia, St Bartholomew’s established itself as a community leader in civil rights, AIDS outreach, LGBTQI issues, homelessness and other concerns starting in 1954. The memorial noted that the last of four lynchings documented in that county occurred in 1945.“‘The past is never dead. It’s not even past,’” said Williams, quoting William Faulkner.“The fact that we went as a church, a community of faith, amplified, almost prism-like, the ferocity of getting as close as we possibly could to the evil reality of lynching,” trip organizer Scotty Greene added. “Our shared faith in Christ got us down that road to do that. For me, this pilgrimage was functioning as Ken Wilber described religion: ‘not a conventional bolstering of consciousness but a radical transmutation and transformation at the deepest seat of consciousness itself.’ As another pilgrim shared with me, I’ll never be the same.”The August light amid these hanging memorials to lynching victims creates a strong sense of the sacred, almost like being in church. Photo: John AgelThe memorial hinted at Christianity’s influence in the lives of victims and perpetrators. Biblical names dotted the sculptures: Amos, Emanuel, Caleb, Luke, Solomon, Ephraim, Isaac, Moses, Simon, Elijah, Abraham, Samuel and Mary. A minister from Hernando County, Florida, Arthur St. Clair, was lynched in 1877 for performing an interracial wedding.“I found myself with tears in my eyes as I thought about how some must have felt abandoned by the law or even by God,” said pilgrimage participant Alexander Escobar. “In response I found myself saying, ‘I care.’”We are more than the worst thing we have ever doneAt the Legacy Museum, built at the riverfront where slave trading businesses once outnumbered Montgomery’s churches, the travelers learned how the elaborate narrative of white supremacy allows racial terrorism to flourish as a social custom outside the law.While faith in God enabled many African-Americans to endure inhumane treatment, their oppressors often saw their domination as a God-given right.“Lord, how come me here?” is a lyric to a spiritual sung at the museum by holograms of actors depicting chained slaves. As slavery gave way to a legal system that metes out excessive punishment to African-Americans, a newspaper reported a 14-year-old African-American boy was sentenced in 1944 to die in South Carolina’s electric chair. Because the boy was too short for his head to reach the electrodes, guards used a Bible as a booster seat.These truths created a fresh, searing awareness among those on the pilgrimage.“The stunning justification that ‘the other’ is not really a human being — and therefore deserves slavery, lynching, unfair prosecution, segregation, languishing imprisonment, legal killing — brings home to me the objectification of human beings in our society,” said Marilyn Hughes. “It hurts in my heart and it hurts our nation. And yet, there is still love enough for forgiveness and healing. This was my learning.”“This memorial shows us how our country’s original sins — economic cruelty, slavery and genocide — are eating away at our social fabric like cancers,” said Ray Gangarosa, a pilgrimage participant. “As we observe, in real time, these echoes from our sordid past eroding our democratic institutions and those of other nations around the world, God is making it crystal clear that there is no cure, no redemption, no salvation for these sins but total excision.”Many faith groups seeking reconciliation in MontgomeryThe memorial and museum have hosted more than 100,000 visitors since opening in April.“We are especially thrilled to be seeing great interest from church groups and faith communities, thousands of whom have already visited the sites,” said Sia Sanneh, an attorney with the Equal Justice Institute, in an email response for this story. “It has been moving to see so many faith groups honoring the lives lost during the era of racial terror, and we are also seeing faith groups interested both in confronting this difficult history and in better understanding the links between the history of racial injustice and our contemporary challenges.”Pilgrimages like this demonstrate that “the work of racial healing and reconciliation in the church will be done most effectively at the parish level,” said Catherine Meeks, founding executive director of the Absalom Jones Episcopal Center for Racial Healing in Atlanta. “It delights me to see a parish taking the initiative to do this work, and I am deeply grateful to the Rev. Dr. Angela Shepherd and the St. Bartholomew pilgrims for making this important trip.”In downtown Montgomery, the pilgrimage rested at St. John’s Episcopal Church, where the Rev. Robert C. Wisnewski Jr., rector (in light blue shirt), explained its history as the home church of Confederacy president Jefferson Davis. Photo: Virginia MurraySt. John’s Episcopal Church in downtown Montgomery, known as the parish where Confederacy president Jefferson Davis worshipped, has hosted several groups in conjunction with their visits to the memorial and museum. St. Bartholomew’s was the latest one.Its rector, the Rev. Robert C. Wisnewski Jr., related how Episcopalians of Montgomery built the church and installed a spectacular Tiffany stained glass window. Tourists enjoy seeing the Jefferson Davis Pew, architecture and history.Wealth, in Montgomery and other cities across the Southern states, was acquired through free slave labor and protected by Jim Crow laws.“I loved looking at the beautiful decor, but it reminded me of how easy it is to be lulled into ignoring the ugly foundation of our privilege,” said Virginia Murray of St. Bartholomew’s. “The rector’s informal talk to us also demonstrated the challenges the Episcopal Church has, to make a place for Episcopalians on all stages of the reconciliation process. Although my church building was erected after slavery ended, I am still voluntarily a member of a denomination that was complicit in slavery, lynching, etc.”The pilgrimage’s return bus trip included a closing liturgy, partly drawn from “Seeing the Face of God in Each Other: Antiracism Training Manual” and led by the Rev. Beverley Elliott, St. Bartholomew’s senior associate for pastoral care and adult formation and learning.“The old satanic foe of racism is still woven into the fabric of our lives,” she read.“Although, without you, we are not equal to this foe, through your grace empower us to overcome the forces that break community,” the travelers answered.“You have created us as your own family. You have called us together,” she said. “The time is now for new beginnings.”“May we do the work we must do in your church and world, while it is still day, before it is too late,” the travelers responded. “May we never tire, nor turn our back, nor believe our work is ever done. For each day we must begin anew.”— Michelle Hiskey is an Atlanta-based freelance writer and member of St. Bartholomew’s Episcopal Church. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Events August 29, 2018 at 11:54 am One can not, one should not condone lynchings in any where especially in the US. Please go read this piece for Yale University about Lynchings and Race riots in the United State. It is not a southern problem but a national problem.http://teachersinstitute.yale.edu/curriculum/units/1979/2/79.02.04.x.html Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Belleville, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Press Release Service Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Comments are closed. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York August 30, 2018 at 11:09 am I did indeed follow the link to the curriculum posted in 1979 by the Yale Teacher’s Institute and found its content dated and biased. And to your point, while only four states (MA, RI, VT, NH) were NOT the site of a lynching, it remains that 90% of lynchings occurred in Southern or border states. Over 50% of all lynchings between 1830 and 1951 occurred in Mississippi. And the significant majority of individuals were African American – whites did get lynched, but largely for aiding and/or defending African Americans.“Problem” is a polite euphemism for the tyranny of violence inflicted on blacks in this country. It was indeed a Southern evil, and a white evil, and remains so to this day. Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Charles Pierce says: Featured Jobs & Callscenter_img Submit a Job Listing Rector Knoxville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Comments (4) TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC August 29, 2018 at 11:54 pm Sounds very encompassing. I like the focus on MLK’s journey as a spiritual leader working for justice for African Americans. Without his support, I doubt we would have made the progress we have seen so far – acknowledging we have a way to go still. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Racial Justice & Reconciliation Submit an Event Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Advocacy Peace & Justice, Director of Music Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Cynthia Weinmann says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Collierville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA last_img read more

For a Louisiana priest who’s no stranger to disasters, COVID-19…

first_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Knoxville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska By Egan MillardPosted Mar 23, 2020 The Rev. Tommy Dillon (center) married Corinne Perez and Thomas Gray in Lake Charles, Louisiana, on March 20, 2020. Photo: Kirby GrayEditor’s note: This story is the first in a series about how priests and lay members across The Episcopal Church are caring for one another during the COVID-19 pandemic. If you have an inspiring pastoral care story to share, send it to [email protected][Episcopal News Service] When it comes to providing pastoral care in times of crisis, the Rev. Tommy Dillon is about as prepared as any priest could be.Dillon, the rector of St. Margaret’s Episcopal Church in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, learned the logistics of disaster response firsthand in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. While serving at a different church in Baton Rouge, Dillon helped feed 30,000 meals per day to Katrina evacuees through his family’s catering business and tended to the spiritual needs of the evacuees – all on top of his duties as a parish priest.Then, while serving as a rector in San Francisco, Dillon was named the disaster preparedness coordinator for the Diocese of California and worked with the city to make his church’s neighborhood more earthquake resilient, using grants from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Federal Emergency Management Agency.“We started having meetings between all the different groups in the neighborhood – businesses, condo associations – and we developed relationships. We came up with plans about, if there was an earthquake, who would provide food, who would provide shelter,” Dillon told Episcopal News Service.In 2013, the Diocese of California passed a resolution requiring every church to have a disaster preparedness plan. And one of the scenarios Dillon worked with his congregation to prepare for – along with the more prominent threats of earthquakes and tsunamis – was a pandemic.“We talked about, how can we be the church when we’re not able to respond in person? And we went through scenarios around that,” Dillon said.Then, the week that Dillon moved back to Louisiana to start his current job in 2016, over 100,000 homes in southern Louisiana were flooded.“I was mucking people’s homes out before my first day of work, because we had about 12 to 15 families in our church whose homes were destroyed by the flood,” Dillon said.So when COVID-19 started to rear its head in the United States, Dillon took swift precautionary actions to protect his congregation. He switched to online worship at St. Margaret’s starting on March 15, a week before the bishop of Louisiana required it, knowing from his experience in preparing for pandemics and other disasters that early action can save lives.“It’s taken a horrible pandemic for us to think about what church is, more than just a Sunday gathering.”“Those experiences really allowed me to be able to just jump right in and start doing things rather than stepping back,” Dillon explained. “The Wednesday before, I told my congregation that was there for our healing service: ‘You go out tonight and just buy what you need for three weeks.’ … And all that experience in how this would unfold came to fruition.”As other institutions struggle to implement a pandemic response that tends to the needs of the community without contributing to further contagion, Dillon and his congregation are demonstrating how the church can do exactly that.“I’m a creative person,” Dillon told ENS, “and this is just feeding me to think about long-term planning of reaching more people as the church. And it’s taken a horrible pandemic for us to think about what church is, more than just a Sunday gathering.”The Rev. Tommy Dillon, rector of St. Margaret’s Episcopal Church in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Photo: Ronda BroatchSt. Margaret’s, like many Episcopal churches, is livestreaming its services, and Sunday school is continuing via Zoom videoconference. But one of Dillon’s top priorities is connecting with older parishioners in particular – and not simply checking on them, but staying in regular contact. Using a phone tree, every parishioner with a phone number in the parish database was called on March 14, and the parish pastoral care team is calling anyone who is over 60 and lives alone and those with medical conditions at least every three days – or, if needed, every day.With the situation changing swiftly and unpredictably, Dillon is working with those he serves to meet their needs in a flexible way. He was scheduled to marry Corinne Perez and Thomas Gray of Houston, Texas, in New Orleans on March 21, with a full Eucharist and a reception. When those plans were canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Dillon encouraged them to get married anyway, recognizing that a couple’s legal status would be critically important in the event of a medical emergency.“I talked to them and I was like, ‘You know what? This is a time when the wedding needs to happen. Because, no matter what happens, you need to be legally married,’” Dillon said. “And so I said, ‘Let’s make this happen.’”The couple had a Louisiana marriage license, so Dillon suggested they meet in Lake Charles, Louisiana – near the border with Texas, and about halfway between Houston and Baton Rouge – on March 20 and have a big celebration with friends and family later. In keeping with health officials’ guidelines on physical distancing, it was a very small service: just Dillon, the couple, and two witnesses. Standing by a picnic table in a park, Perez and Gray became husband and wife.“It was one of the holiest weddings I’ve ever officiated at,” Dillon said. “I said, ‘The kingdom of God is right here in the middle of this pandemic.’”Dillon sees the kingdom of God in the way his parishioners are caring for each other, too. He was moved to see a photo of longtime parishioner Dottie Smith keeping her husband Randy company by sitting outside the window of his room at the assisted living center where he is being treated for diabetes. Dottie has been visiting Randy every day, Dillon said, and when the facility stopped allowing visitors, Dottie simply sat outside. She even brought him his favorite barbecue dish – which the staff delivered to his room – and kept him company while he ate.“That’s what the kingdom of God is … Dottie Smith sitting outside her husband’s window, just lovingly looking at him, and for him to be able to see her,” Dillon said.Dillon knows that keeping his community spiritually and physically healthy through this pandemic will be a long haul, and he’s busy envisioning different ways that he can provide care while keeping his distance.“We’re dreaming now in our church about how we respond in a healthy way to the needs in our neighborhood and be the church for the neighborhood,” he told ENS. “And I truly believe that, for all of us who are priests, this is the moment that we’ve been trained for our whole lives, to be that holy presence right now. And everything we’ve learned has built up to be able to be that presence.”This story has been updated to reflect the cancellation of St. Margaret’s drive-through Eucharist service.– Egan Millard is an assistant editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Tampa, FL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Press Release Rector Martinsville, VA Tags Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Job Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY COVID19Pastoral, Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC For a Louisiana priest who’s no stranger to disasters, COVID-19 is ‘the moment we’ve been trained for’ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group COVID-19, Rector Shreveport, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Health & Healthcare Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Collierville, TN Rector Bath, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Jobs & Calls Press Release Service Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Smithfield, NClast_img read more

Wyoming diocese ‘spreads the love’ with million-dollar COVID-19 relief

first_img By Pat McCaughanPosted Apr 9, 2020 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab A bison grazes after sunset in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. Photo: Jim Urquhart/REUTERS[Episcopal News Service] Each of the 46 congregations in the Episcopal Diocese of Wyoming has received a $10,000 grant and instructions to take Holy Week to discern ways to spend it to aid those affected by COVID-19.For the Rev. Roxanne Jimerson-Friday, who serves two congregations on the Wind River Reservation, the needs are painfully clear and relief from the pandemic is absolutely essential.“Unemployment was already high on the reservation, probably about 50 to 60%,” according to Jimerson-Friday, the first woman Shoshone Tribal member ordained in The Episcopal Church. “Now, it is even higher. Businesses have closed. People have been laid off. There are two grocery stores on the reservation. One closed yesterday because they had an employee who tested positive.“There are about 26 people in our county that tested positive out of 200 cases in the state, and 11 of those are from the reservation,” she said.Jimerson-Friday, who serves both Our Father’s House Episcopal Church in Ethete and the Shoshone Episcopal Mission at Fort Washakie, said members are making DIY face masks to aid others and are hoping to work together to create a food bank and a help center.“We’d like to start a food bank with nonperishable items, and then we’re looking to see if we could get diapers, baby wipes and other items for young families,” Jimerson-Friday said.Wyoming Bishop John Smylie, in an April 3 letter to congregations, wrote: “Our hope is that you will dream of ways you can make a love-spreading difference in the lives of those negatively impacted by this crisis. We are asking that you distribute these dollars within 60 days to meet the most pressing needs you currently discern.”Vernetta Panzetanga, a Shoshone Tribal member and a member of the Shoshone Episcopal Mission in Fort Washakie, Wyoming, sews DIY face masks to aid others. Photo: Courtesy of Wind River Reservation MinistryThe grants are part of the $1 million commitment to COVID-19 pandemic relief made by the Foundation for the Episcopal Diocese of Wyoming, according to Gary Hartman, a board member. Congregations are asked to spend the funds on childcare, vulnerable adults, food insecurity or other assistance, but not on church capital expenditures or operating costs.The foundation has assets totaling $78 million currently, mostly from private gifts and bequests, according to Press Stephens, executive director. A large part of the foundation’s funds derived from a bequest from a donor in the cable, radio and television business, he said. “It’s a remarkable story of how those gifts can do God’s work in a remarkable way. It’s just a good story of a remarkable planned giving arrangement by someone who really cared about his church.”Stephens said the foundation wanted to get the funds disbursed as quickly as possible “because people needed the money yesterday.”Hartman said the foundation is encouraging churches to work with community partners. “There are a lot of nonprofits in these communities, both city- and county-based, including food banks, who are providing meals for kids not attending school.”COVID-19 has resulted in food insecurity; loss of jobs; and insufficient income to pay rent, mortgages and utilities. “If the money could not be used by the local congregation in the next 60 days, we’ve asked that they come back to the diocese with a plan of how they intend to spend the money,” Hartman said.The novel coronavirus first originated in China in late December and has since spread worldwide killing 76,500 people. In late March, New York City became the U.S. epicenter, with the virus since spreading to all 50 states and Puerto Rico.Wyoming’s first coronavirus case was reported March 11. That number has risen since to about 200, with no deaths reported. On March 19, Governor Mark Gordon ordered the closure of public spaces in an effort to slow the spread of the virus. A day later, Smylie directed congregations to suspend worship, meetings and gatherings, and social activities.A University of Wyoming statewide survey has revealed that nearly a third of the state’s 577,000 residents say they or their immediate family members have lost jobs or been laid off because of COVID-19.In Jackson, COVID-19-imposed closures have impacted the local tourist economy, according to the Rev. Jimmy Bartz, rector of St. John’s Church.“We sit at the southern end of the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem,” Bartz said. “This is the gateway to the Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks. Both are closed. We are one of the premiere ski destinations in North America, and our ski resort, the Jackson Mountain Resorts, closed early. Unemployment is epidemic here.”Concerns that local hospitals could be overwhelmed by the virus prompted the mayors of several cities, including nearby Victor and Driggs in Idaho, to make commercials essentially pleading with people “not to come here,” Bartz added. “We have a less-than-50-bed hospital, and we’re in the early stages of this.”Barbara Ferris-Mireau, a member of the of Fort Washakie community, and an Eastern Shoshone Tribal member, is making masks, quilts and other items as needed. Photo: Courtesy of Wind River Reservation MinistryAs a foundation board member, Bartz had been contacting congregations to offer assistance and support. “A church in Saratoga — which sits in the second-most impoverished community in our diocese — is talking about finding ways to provide Wi-Fi hotspots for students so they could continue to engage in schooling,” he said.Others are considering strengthening existing partnerships with food banks and local utility providers “because they know people will struggle with light and heating bills. There are a lot of people who are hungry now because they are not employed. They’re trying to reserve cash to pay their rent or mortgage. There have been huge increases in visits to local food banks,” Bartz said.The Rev. Bernadine Craft, a former foundation board member, is rector of the Church of the Holy Communion in Rock Springs, a community of about 25,000 heavily dependent upon the oil, gas and minerals industries.“We’re telling people, ‘Let’s use Holy Week as a discernment,’” said Craft, a former state senator who was baptized, confirmed and married in the church she now serves. “We may end up with something we haven’t thought about yet.“We will divide the money among areas where it is needed most. It can be the difference between whether a family eats that night,” she said. “And then we will apply for additional funding, to continue helping for as long as it takes.”Craft also serves the Oregon Trail Memorial Church in Eden Valley and said that, while both congregations number less than 50 on an average Sunday, they are very active and excited about the possibilities for helping their neighbors.The current grants mirror similar diocesan efforts to raise suicide prevention and awareness and alleviate food insecurity. Wyoming has one of the highest suicide rates in the nation, she said. Previously, Smylie created Mustard Seed Grants, where each parish received a $10,000 grant and was invited to spend the money on community improvement.“Every community in Wyoming is very different,” Craft said. “We found, if we gave grants to local parishes, they could reach as many people directly as possible. This is so incredibly important, to put money where it’s going to do the most good, which is in the community.”Sweetwater County, where Holy Communion is located, had four confirmed cases of coronavirus, she told ENS recently. The church is considering a high priority those “who have lost their jobs and are now struggling. We are particularly targeting families with children.”Other high priorities are victims of domestic violence and single mothers with children. “So many people live life on the edge and are one paycheck away from being homeless, from being hungry anyway,” Craft said. “The slightest little thing, which of course is the horrible thing of this pandemic, can push them over the edge.”In Buffalo, a ranching and tourist community located at the foot of the Bighorn Mountains, the Bread of Life Food Bank has been on the front lines, aiding the food-insecure for several decades, according to the Rev. Doug Wasinger.“When it became clear that COVID-19 was shifting things around, a group of people who work with feeding kids — the school system, the senior center and Bread of Life — got together to see how kids could get food even when schools closed,” according to Wasinger, rector of St. Luke’s Church in Buffalo.Previously, the food bank fed about 200 people per week, “and we are anticipating that the number will go up pretty quickly.”Vestry approval is required for grant-spending, and Wasinger is certain St. Luke’s will support the food pantry. “We will also consider rent alleviation and utility support for the vulnerable, and then we’ll start getting creative,” he said.“I’m seeing is a lot of creative ways to keep people going, that spread through Facebook and phone calls,” Wasinger added. “There’ll be a post that says a restaurant is open, so call in and order something and go pick it up. There is a real intentionality about keeping people employed and working, even though people are not seeing revenue coming in.”Wasinger added that Holy Week discernment for spending the grant feels prophetic. “This is starting to feel like the disciples in the Upper Room. This is no longer an intellectual exercise.“Jesus said, ‘Watch for the resurrection.’ God’s going to do some amazing things through this. Maybe we get a big reset about what’s really important and how do we take care of each other and discover we have a lot of residual strength we didn’t know we had.”– The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. She is based in Los Angeles. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Events Rector Pittsburgh, PA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit an Event Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Tampa, FL Wyoming diocese ‘spreads the love’ with million-dollar COVID-19 relief Congregations take Holy Week to discern how to spend $10K grant Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Knoxville, TN center_img Rector Albany, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH COVID-19, Rector Hopkinsville, KY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Press Release Rector Belleville, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Job Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Health & Healthcare Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Tags Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Bath, NC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID last_img read more

Beyond sports: Off-the-field after school activities to challenge your child

first_img From football to baseball,soccer and lacrosse, sports are what most parents initially think about when considering extracurricular activities for their children. However, today’s schools and communities understand there’s a need for diverse after school options that challenge kids in a variety of ways.“While participating in sports can have many benefits, to raise a well-rounded child it’s important to consider other afterschool activities that help them to develop different skillsets,” says Ellen Marks, educational expert and curriculum director at Bricks 4 Kidz. “Introducing a variety of activities helps kids have many experiences so they can discover their natural talents as well as improve areas where they may struggle.”These extracurricular activities are guaranteed to broaden your children’s horizons and provide them with plenty of fun and education:Nature: Because we live in such a digitized world, many school systems are now offering nature-based programs that teach important science and biology skills while instilling respect for Mother Nature. Check out these types of programs at school or through your local nature center. Scouts is another fantastic option with many nature-based activities.Theater: Many kids dream of becoming stars on their favorite TV shows, and theater experience is the first step in exploring that interest. It’s not just for high school students. Acting classes, musical theater and play production are all great options enjoyed by students with a wide-range of abilities.Help your kids grow important science, technology, engineering and math skills through STEM classes.STEM: Help your kids grow important science, technology, engineering and math skills through STEM classes like Bricks 4 Kidz. These group classes — available for kindergarten through middle school — use LEGO Bricks, gears, motors and more to build exciting projects. Students learn to work together and solve problems while creating something they can feel proud of.Music: Music afterschool activities exercise the brain in a variety of ways. Inherently creative, music is also very technical. Learning about notes, chords and music theory is mathematical in many ways. Explore choir, instrument classes and band camps to inspire your junior Mozart.Martial arts: Taekwondo (from Korea) and Karate (from Japan) are both great options for children. Classes offer physical exercise that improve balance and stamina, but parents enjoy many of the other benefits that often come from studying martial arts, including increased focus, discipline and respect for others.Cooking: With the expansive popularity of cooking shows, kids have never had more interest in what goes on in the kitchen. Sign students up for cooking classes and they’ll learn proper cooking technique and whip up some tasty treats in the process. Soon enough, you may be able to hand off one meal a week to your chef-in-training.Art: With the reality of many schools reducing or cutting art programs, exploring art education outside of the classroom becomes even more important. Kids love to create and there are a variety of art programs for the next Picasso or Rembrandt. Drawing programs are wildly popular, but also consider sculpture, pottery and mixed-media classes.Technical clubs: Today’s youth grow up with technology, so they have a natural inclination toward any activity that incorporates it. For example, robotics clubs are popping up in elementary and middle schools across the country. Check out Bricks 4 Kidz Jr. Robotics and Advanced Robotics classes where kids build a motorized model and watch it come to life using simple LEGO WeDo and LEGO Mindstorms EV3 software. Learn more at www.bricks4kidz.com. Please enter your comment! TAGSChildren’s activities Previous articleAnnouncing the second winner of 4 Tickets to Disney on IceNext articleWhat’s that colorful tape athletes are wearing? Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Please enter your name here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address herelast_img read more