Internet Explorer 10 takes the lead in browser privacy

first_imgThe Windows 8 Release Preview is here, and scores of testers are busily sifting through the updated next-gen OS to see what’s changed. Microsoft spilled the beans about a few new features. One of the most surprising: Internet Explorer 10 has support for Do Not Track — and that it’s turned on by default.Advertisers, of course, are not happy about the move. The Digital Advertising Alliance had previously given the Obama White House their solemn word that they’d support the privacy standard. They would, provided it wasn’t turned on by default. Microsoft has previously backtracked on privacy issues like this — most notably when they scaled back Internet Explorer 8’s InPrivate filtering feature to appease advertisers back when the browser was being developed.But that was then and this is now, and Microsoft believes that it’s time to put control back in the hands of the users and start building trust online. Chief Privacy Officer Brendon Lynch notes in his post that some consumers may want to switch on tracking in order to receive ads that are more relevant — one benefit of tracking that’s typically mentioned by advocates. That’s fine, says Lynch, so long as it’s the consumer making the choice to open up the information stream.Did anyone see this coming? Microsoft has steadily added privacy-related features to Internet Explorer over the past three releases. In IE10, there’s now support for Do Not Track, Tracking Protection Lists (which work even when a website doesn’t support DNT), and InPrivate filtering. Has Microsoft really taken the lead when it comes to building trust in the browser?More at Microsoft and Engadgetlast_img


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